Behind the Camera 23

Bruton plus

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Finding photographic features in the back of beyond in rural Somerset is something Michael and I seem to do on a regular basis, this time we decided to visit the scenic site of Bruton; just over ten miles east of Yeovil. It has been proposed that this is the smallest town in England something hard to reckon seeing how much new build is happening. We started by climbing a small hill to a dovecote that overlooks most of Bruton’s central area, from here the resulting pictures show how it actually is. But first a closer look at the top of the tower.

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The comparative chunkiness of the stonework in the tower belies the true size of the buzzard watching over us.

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 Taking up a large percentage of the town is an independant 350 pupil school whose main buildings are nearly 600 years old, St Mary’s church shown in the next picture is of even greater age, building began almost a thousand years ago.

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As usual for our jaunts into the countryside we seem to just take any road that looks as if there could be something round the corner, this time it was another church; St Peter’ Redlynch.

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Seen below us on the same road a scene saying autumn is coming.

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Driving on for a few miles we decide to head home to escape the start of rain and its gloomy grey skies, but turning another corner we suddenly strike gold.

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The last picture shows off one of the grandest of folly’s that is just visible at the top of the hill.

Yeovilton Air Show 2013

Met up with Michael for the first time in ages, this time using his contact at Limington village church; allowed up the tower where we had a cracking view across Yeovilton air base and the spectacular displays from the red arrows and others performing at the annual air show.

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Last of all came the surprise of the afternoon as a buzzard came out from the trees below us and started to circle probably looking for his tea.

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 We left the tower before the end of the show to escape the 30C plus temperatures.

Behind the Camera 22 – 1

Lost lakes of the Levels

This is the first time the water level has dropped allowing full access to Muchelney since last November. The village is no longer an island with the course of the River Parrett and adjacent roads now properly visible.

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Yes the sun did shine and out came a little bunny to celebrate a chance to warm up, even the swans looked as if they were a bit hearty.

Behind the Camera 21

Hinton St Mary

In between the visits to Sturminster and Cutt mills we stopped at Hinton St Mary to enjoy a snack lunch while taking in an attractive landscape in North dorset. The local church of St Peters is over 500 years old and stands next to a manor house that used to be a nunnery. The avenue of trees is open to the public and even supplied a musical interlude with a resident thrush singing in a treetop above our chosen picnic spot. This proved to be another lucky day for finding places away from the crowds but well worth the effort.

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This last picture is a particular favourite that uses a low in the sky sun with great effect.

 

Behind the Camera 20

Bradford On Avon.

Michael and me on the road again finding a picturesque idyll to be found just south of Bath which has the added interest of the Bristol Avon River and the Kennett and Avon Canal both going through the town.

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No matter where you go in the centre of the town the Catholic Church seems to be in view.

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The question of how the building  below stays standing does show good reason as to why there is no parking here.

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Below is a Mill on the Blog at Avoncliff not far from town which has an aquaduct taking the Kennett and Avon Canal over the River Avon.

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Heading home for an early Bath, only a few miles on from here.

Behind the Camera 17

Muchelney revisited

This is the third post I have published  showing the effects of flooding on the Somerset Levels, a phenomenon which began in Sept/October 2012. Back then it was very localised mainly affecting areas close to the river Parrett and not then closing roads and damaging property. At the end of November the amount of water had increased enough to create large lakes as seen in an earlier posting at that time. Revisiting  Langport Michael and I took some more shots showing how little has changed in the last six weeks as to how much water still needs to be pumped away. Most of these pictures were taken from the grounds behind Langport Church.

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Well it could have been the Loch Langport Monster? Didn’t bother the swans though.

Behind the Camera 16

Floody Hell

Making the best of a break in the wet weather Michael and me took to the high ground for some landscape and big sky photography. An opportunity predictably in vision at the local beauty spot of Ham Hill, all looks fine until you look closer at the watery features seen in the distance.

At first glance the small lakes look to be naturally placed within this landscape but anyone who has seen the recent news will know this is certainly not a regular sight seen at this angle. From Ham Hill we moved over to Yeovilton village for a closer look, luckily the roads were clear so access was not a problem. The  result of an accumulation of rainwater over the summer and, more pertinently, the heavy storms over the last few weeks, was there before our eyes.

 

The light was playing tricks with us, the pictures above were to our left facing north, then to our right and into the sun the reflections and the shadows make for a completely different perspective on the scene.

The next two pictures are there to challenge you blog readers to play spot the difference, the first is a few months old and shows the River Yeo in normal flow; see if you can spot the changes made by adding a bit extra water.

 

 

Yes that is the same weir in both pictures.

 

 

 

 

Looking left again we see the river heading off to the Somerset Levels proper and the scene that greeted us from Langport which overlooked the main area of flooding.

 

 

 

 

The last picture is of Muchelney Church, those with a memory will have seen shots from a few weeks ago when there was a flood by the River Parrett, but no where near this scale of a problem. For a recap see Behind the Camera 14.